The Branding Psychology of Your Color Palette

11 Apr, 2017 Design,Personal Development

The color palette of your book or brand is an important symbol of what your brand stands for.

Before even reading the words, readers and clients will form conscious and subconscious associations with the colors you choose.

In fact, over 90% of shoppers make a decision based on color and visual aesthetics!

Make sure your color palette is giving exactly the message you want — whether you’re rebranding or starting from step one.

Instead of rehashing repetitive color “facts,” such as “red is the color of love” and “purple indicates royalty,” we’re going to rely on research-based analysis.

The reason being, color associations, are too dependent on personal experience. You can’t lie a blanket statement over colors and expect everyone to react the same.

Colors Are Only as Strong as Your Brand’s Personality

If we can’t point to one tried and true emotion linking to a color, then it’s hard to expect every viewer will embody the same emotion from your brand image.

To liken the odds of eliciting a desired emotion, focus on the personality of your brand.

It’s more important for your color palette to align with the personality of your brand, rather than selecting colors which you believe will evoke certain emotions.

For example, let’s consider the Apple logo: it is mostly white, bare and simple. Surely, Apple’s branding team understood yellow is normally associated with happiness — don’t they want their customers to feel happy when purchasing their products?

Of course, they do! But the personality of their brand is simplicity and innovation, thus evoking happiness and satisfaction among their customers.

Color Preferences Vary by Gender

I hesitate to say all men and all women share similar views when it comes to color. Personal preferences, cultural differences, experiences and lifestyle choices have a huge impact on how we perceive and react to color.

Nevertheless, there are some research-backed similarities, which may be helpful:

Women’s Favorite Colors

  1. Blue
  2. Purple
  3. Green

Women’s Least Favorite Colors

  1. Orange
  2. Brown
  3. Gray

Men’s Favorite Colors

  1. Blue
  2. Green
  3. Black

Men’s Least Favorite Colors

  1. Brown
  2. Orange
  3. Purple

A Couple Notable Factors

  • Both groups favor blue.
  • There is a major disparity over the color purple.
  • Both groups dislike brown and orange.

Further Gender Studies Show Even More Interesting Results

  • Women prefer soft colors and “tints” (colors added with white).
  • Men prefer bold colors and “shades” (colors added with black).

Regardless of Gender, We Know a Few Things to Be Widely Accepted

  • There is no single “best” color for attracting consumers, but research participants were more likely to recall information when a color “stuck out like a sore thumb.”
  • Most consumers prefer a mix of similar hues and appreciate a palette with a single, highly contrasting color.
  • Consumers respond to “color hierarchy.” For example, on a webpage maintain the same color for headings, subheadings and “calls to action,” that way a user understands a particular color leads them to a link, purchase or contact form.

Were you surprised by any of the findings shared?

What do you think about our color palette? Tell us in the comments below!

Image attribution.

Summary
Article Name
The Branding Psychology of Your Color Palette
Description
The color palette of your book or brand is an important symbol of what your brand stands for. Before even reading the words, readers and clients will form conscious and subconscious associations with the colors you choose.
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